Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

To learn more click here

Science

Ex-Roche Campus Reinvented as ‘On3’ Science Center

Nutley, NJ, June 20, 2017 — Owen Proctor reports in The Record/NorthJersey.com that the flagship project for the campus is a medical school that is a joint plan of Hackensack Meridian Health and Seton Hall University, and would be the state’s first private medical school in 50 years.

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) has approved $16.9 million in tax credits to develop the site.

In discussing the formation of a bio sciences campus, Diaz cited Silicon Valley and Cambridge, Mass., where such “eco-systems” exist.  “Sort of like, where there’s a McDonald’s, there’s a Burger King,” Diaz said. Continue reading

Opinion: Former Merck CEO and Princeton University President Emeritus on ‘Trump’s War on Science Threatens U.S. Prosperity’

Princeton, NJ, June 12, 2017Roy Vagelos, retired Chairman and CEO of Merck & Co. and Chairman of the Board of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, and Shirley Tilghman, President Emeritus of Princeton University and a professor of Molecular Biology and Public Affairs, published the following opinion piece in The Star-Ledger on June 6:

In the past 40 years, the U.S. has been the world leader in converting fundamental scientific discoveries into innovative new treatments for life-threatening disease.  New drugs, vaccines, and medical devices have improved human health and increased our lifespan. Continue reading

National Institutes of Health Redirecting Grants to Boost Young Scientists’ Careers, Research

Bethesda, MD, June 12, 2017 — Thomas M. Burton reports in The Wall Street Journal that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) said it would begin redirecting up to about $1.1 billion in research-grant money a year to early- and midcareer scientists to help boost their careers and preserve U.S. science.

The agency said it would begin the redistribution immediately with about $210 million annually, but that the amount would steadily increase over five years to about $1.1 billion a year. Continue reading

85 Percent of Top Science Posts in Trump Administration Have Yet to Be Filled

President Donald Trump

Washington, DC, June 8, 2017 — Chris Mooney reported in The Washington Post that President Donald Trump is facing science-focused problems and issues with a key limitation: lack of staffing.

As of June 6, the Trump White House had announced a nominee for just seven, or 15 percent, of 46 top science posts in the federal government that require Senate confirmation, according to a Post analysis. Continue reading

Trump Proposed 2018 Budget Makes Heavy Cuts to Science Research

President Donald Trump

Washington, DC, June 5, 2017 — Ali Breland reports on The Hill that President Trump’s fiscal 2018 budget unveiled Tuesday proposes massive cuts for the National Science Foundation.

The plan would cut $776 million, an 11 percent reduction, from the foundation, which gives grants for non-medical research in science and engineering.

Mick Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, defended the proposal, accusing the foundation of wasteful spending. Continue reading

House Science Committee Members Urge President Trump to Bolster Scientific Leadership in Administration

Washington, DC, May 19, 2017 — Lev Facher reports on STAT that, in a May 18 letter to the White House, several Democrats on the House Science Committee are scolding President Trump for his belief in fake news stories, tying that belief to the lack of scientific leadership in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP).

“Until the OSTP is adequately staffed and the director position filled by a qualified, objective scientist who understands the difference between alternative news peddled on alt-right websites and legitimate well-vetted scientific facts, we fear that you will continue to be vulnerable to misinformation and fake news,” the lawmakers wrote in the letter. Continue reading

AAAS Applauds Congress for Protecting Fiscal 2017 R&D Spending

Washington, DC, May 17, 2017 — Anne Q. Hoy reports that the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) applauded congressional leaders for their bipartisan support in backing fiscal 2017 funding for research and development programs, according to a letter AAAS sent to House and Senate leaders on May 9.

“We commend Congress and the White House for working together to prevent a government shutdown and finalizing appropriations for fiscal year 2017,” said Rush Holt, AAAS CEO and executive publisher of the Science family of journals, in the letter sent to House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.). Continue reading

Medical Research, Science Funding Spared Under Budget Deal — But More Battles Ahead

Washington, DC, May 2, 2017 —Joel Achenbach, Ben Guarino, Sarah Kaplan and Darryl Fears report in The Washington Post that the lights will stay on in the federal government, and also in the countless laboratories and universities that depend on federal funding for scientific and medical research.

That’s one upshot of the bipartisan budget deal congressional negotiators reached late Sunday.

The bill, clocking in at more than 1,600 pages, is likely to pass both houses of Congress and be signed into law by President Trump this week.  It covers funding through September. Continue reading

Trump White House — Still Without a Top Science Adviser — Plans to Continue Obama’s Science Fairs

President Donald Trump

Washington, DC, May 1, 2017 — Lev Facher reports on STAT that, while the Trump White House still doesn’t have a top science adviser, it does have a science fair in the works.

A White House official said on April 21 that the science fair, an annual tradition started by former President Barack Obama in 2010, will continue under President Trump.  No date has been finalized.

The news came just ahead of a science-centric weekend in Washington.   Continue reading

Scientific Groups Vow to Carry on Spirit of March for Science; Aim to Promote Sound Policies that Advance Discovery and Benefit Society

The Hon. Rush Holt

Washington, DC, April 29, 2017 — The nation’s leading scientific organizations vowed to build on the momentum generated by the March for Science — held on April 22 in Washington, DC and around the globe — by continuing to reach out to the public and policymakers at all levels to promote sound scientific policies that advance discovery and benefit society, according to a joint statement issued on April 24.

“We must build on this momentum created by the marches to more actively demonstrate the value of science to local, state and national policymakers, as well as in classrooms and local communities,” the letter said.

“We pledge to keep the March for Science momentum going, to remain at the forefront of this public engagement of science and to redouble our collective efforts to serve science and society.” Continue reading