Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

To learn more click here

Rutgers-Newark

U.S. News & World Report Ranks 8 New Jersey Colleges Among Best; Princeton Again No. 1

Newark, NJ, September 15, 2017 — Payton Guion reports in The Star-Ledger/NJ.com that New Jersey has eight colleges ranked among the top schools in the country, according to the 2018 list from U.S. News and World Report, up from seven that made the grade in last year’s rankings.

Rowan University is the newcomer of the N.J. schools that made the list, coming in at 171 after not being ranked last year.

In ranking the top national universities, U.S. News considered 311 institutions. Continue reading

Opinion: Rutgers-Newark Chancellor Nancy Cantor: Making America Great Again? NJ Can Lead the Way

Newark, NJ, January 30, 2017Rutgers University-Newark Chancellor Nancy Cantor writes in The Star-Ledger:

What does it mean to “make America great again?”

Not an easy question to answer, and surely one that will evoke many different solutions, as we all bring diverse experiences and expertise to the search for an answer.

Fully cultivating America’s diverse talent pool is key to finding any reasonable answer. We need all minds on deck to right the course of America. Continue reading

Rutgers-Newark Research: Working Toward a Cure for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Rutgers NewarkNewark, NJ, April 14, 2016 ― With all that we humans put in our mouths, one of our digestive systems’ most important jobs is self-preservation — keeping the linings of the intestines and other vital organs from breaking down under the strain they endure.

In more than 16 million Americans according to the National Institutes of Health, that process has failed, creating a serious ailment called inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD.

“People with that disease can suffer from abdominal pain and cramping,” says Nan Gao, an assistant professor of biology at Rutgers University-Newark (RU-N). “It has a great effect on people’s lives because there is no clear treatment for it,” he adds. “We also believe it can lead to colon cancer.” Continue reading