Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

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Research

Rutgers-New Brunswick Rated One of Top 100 Research Universities in the World; Ranked No. 31 in U.S.

New Brunswick, NJ, June 26, 2017 — NJBIZ reported that Rutgers-New Brunswick was one of 37 universities in the United States to be ranked among the Top 100 research-intensive universities in the world, according to the prestigious CWTS Leiden Rankings.

Rutgers ranked No. 77 in the world, but No. 31 among schools based in the United States.

Rutgers was behind Cornell (No. 26), Washington University in St. Louis (27) and New York University (29). Continue reading

Rutgers Researchers Invent Lab-on-a-Chip Technology That Could Lead to Wearable Biosensors

Dr. Mehdi Javanmard

New Brunswick, NJ, June 15, 2017 — Imagine wearing a device that continuously analyzes your sweat or blood for different types of biomarkers, such as proteins that show you may have breast cancer or lung cancer.

Rutgers engineers have invented biosensor technology — known as a lab on a chip — that could be used in hand-held or wearable devices to monitor your health and exposure to dangerous bacteria, viruses and pollutants.

“This is really important in the context of personalized medicine or personalized health monitoring,” said Mehdi Javanmard, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. Continue reading

National Institutes of Health Redirecting Grants to Boost Young Scientists’ Careers, Research

Bethesda, MD, June 12, 2017 — Thomas M. Burton reports in The Wall Street Journal that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) said it would begin redirecting up to about $1.1 billion in research-grant money a year to early- and midcareer scientists to help boost their careers and preserve U.S. science.

The agency said it would begin the redistribution immediately with about $210 million annually, but that the amount would steadily increase over five years to about $1.1 billion a year. Continue reading

Three PhRMA Reports Highlight Increasing Global Competition in Biopharmaceutical R&D, Posing Challenges to Future U.S. Standing

Washington, DC, June 9, 2017 — As the U.S. looks to maintain its global leadership in biopharmaceutical research and development, three new reports point to an increasingly competitive global environment — one that requires a thorough assessment of our current public policies.

That includes the biopharmaceutical industry’s investments in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)-based initiatives at the state and national levels given the growing efforts of other countries to compete for the high-wage jobs and robust economic contributions of innovative biopharmaceutical companies.

“The American biopharmaceutical industry is the global leader in research and development (R&D) and has delivered many of the treatments and cures that have saved millions of lives around the world,” said Dr. Anne Pritchett, vice president, policy and research, at the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).  Continue reading

NIH Considers Limits on Individual Research Funding; Impacts Examined

Westerville, OH, June 4, 2017 Robert Ksiazkiewicz reports on State Science & Technology Institute (SSTI), in part one of two, SSTI will examine NIH’s proposed changes that will place limits on individual researcher funding.

On May 2, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that it intends to implement a new approach to grant funding with the purpose of increasing the number of researchers receiving grants.

These proposed changes are due to a highly skewed distribution of NIH funding with 10 percent of NIH-funded investigators receiving over 40 percent of funding.  NIH intends to roll out specific policies and procedures as part of the new approach – titled the Grant Support Index (GSI) – that will assess effectiveness of NIH research investments. Continue reading

Rutgers Research: Graphene-Based Sensor Could Improve Evaluation, Diagnosis and Treatment of Asthma

New Brunswick, NJ, June 3, 2017 — Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have created a graphene-based sensor that could lead to earlier detection of looming asthma attacks and improve the management of asthma and other respiratory diseases, preventing hospitalizations and deaths.

The sensor paves the way for the development of devices — possibly resembling fitness trackers like the Fitbit — which people could wear and then know when and at what dosage to take their medication. Continue reading

White House’s 2018 Budget Plan Would ‘Devastate’ R&D, Says AAAS CEO Rush Holt

Washington, DC, May 31, 2017 — The double-digit percentage cuts President Donald Trump is proposing in his fiscal 2018 budget plan for science and technology programs would “devastate America’s science and technology enterprise” and weaken the nation’s economic growth, Rush Holt, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), said on May 22.

Pointing to the budget blueprint the White House delivered to Congress Tuesday, Holt said, the plan, if enacted, would make steep cuts to science and technology programs and “negatively affect our nation’s economy and public well-being.”

Holt, a former New Jersey Congressman, cited several agencies and programs facing particularly “severe” cuts. Continue reading

Trump Budget Proposes Deep Cuts to Medical Research and Health Care

Washington, DC, May 24, 2017 — Alison Kodjak and Rob Stein report on NPR that President Donald J. Trump’s proposed budget unveiled Tuesday doubles down on major cuts to biomedical research, programs to fight infectious disease outbreaks, health care for the poor, elderly and disabled, and prevention of HIV/AIDS.

The 2018 budget, which is entitled “A New Foundation for American Greatness,” restates the goals of the “skinny budget” the administration released in March, which was widely condemned by scientists and public health advocates. Continue reading

Rutgers Research: Traumatic Brain Injuries May be Helped with Drug Used to Treat Bipolar Disorder

New Brunswick, NJ, May 10, 2017 — A drug used to treat bipolar disorder and other forms of depression may help to preserve brain function and prevent nerve cells from dying in people with a traumatic brain injury, according to a new Rutgers University study.

In research published in Scientific Reports on May 8, Rutgers scientists discovered that lithium — used as a mood stabilizer and to treat depression and bipolar disorder — and rapamycin, a treatment for some forms of cancer, protected nerve cells in the brain and stopped the chemical glutamate from sending signals to other cells and creating further brain cell damage. Continue reading

Alzheimer’s Association and Alzheimer’s Impact Movement Lead the Way to $400 Million Federal Research Increase

Washington, DC, May 9, 2017 — The Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM) and its nationwide network of advocates applaud Congress for hearing their call and taking action in the fight to end Alzheimer’s.

On May 5, a $400 million increase in Alzheimer’s research funding was signed into law, increasing federal funding at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to nearly $1.4 billion.

After years of stagnant funding, this is the second year in a row the Alzheimer’s Association request for historic funding increases has been acted on by our federal leaders. Continue reading