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Neuroscience

Princeton Neuroscience Institute Join with 19 Other Laboratories to Create Virtual Mega-Laboratory; Aims to Probe the Brain’s Deepest Secrets

Princeton, NJ, October 23, 2017Princeton Neuroscience Institute researchers are joining with scientists from 19 other laboratories around the world to create the $15 million International Brain Laboratory (IBL).

Two Princeton neuroscience labs — led by Jonathan Pillow and Ilana Witten — are joining forces with researchers from Europe and the United States to crack the code on how the brain makes choices, by studying the activity and interactions between individual neurons across its different areas.

IBL researchers come from the United States, Great Britain, Portugal, France and Switzerland. Continue reading

Princeton Neuroscience Institute Join with 19 Other Laboratories to Create Virtual Mega-Laboratory; Aims to Probe the Brain’s Deepest Secrets

Princeton, NJ, October 4, 2017Princeton Neuroscience Institute researchers are joining with scientists from 19 other laboratories around the world to create the $15 million International Brain Laboratory (IBL).

Two Princeton neuroscience labs — led by Jonathan Pillow and Ilana Witten — are joining forces with researchers from Europe and the United States to crack the code on how the brain makes choices, by studying the activity and interactions between individual neurons across its different areas.

IBL researchers come from the United States, Great Britain, Portugal, France and Switzerland. Continue reading

Rutgers NJ Medical School Research: Memory Decline After Head Injury May be Prevented by Slowing Brain Cell Growth

New Brunswick, NJ, September 20, 2017 — Robin Lally reports on Rutgers Today that the excessive burst of new brain cells after a traumatic head injury that scientists have traditionally believed helped in recovery could instead lead to epileptic seizures and long-term cognitive decline, according to a new Rutgers New Jersey Medical School study.

In the September issue of Stem Cell Reports, Viji Santhakumar, Ph.D., associate professor in Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Neuroscience, and her colleagues, challenge the prevailing assumption by scientists in the field that excessive neurogenesis (the birth of new brain cells) after injury is advantageous. Continue reading

Stevens Creates Leading Neuroscience Innovations and Rehabilitation Devices to Improve Stroke, Spinal Injury and Other Disabilities.

Hoboken, NJ, September 12, 2017 — Thirty three million Americans have a disability that makes it difficult to carry out daily activities, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Those activities run the gamut from simple to complex, grasping a doorknob to walking.

Thankfully there is an increasing availability of rehabilitative devices that can help. From artificial limbs to electrical assisted devices, these solutions are integrating neurobiological technology to offer better control for people who need them.

One new hotbed of development is Stevens Institute of Technology’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry and Biological Sciences, where researchers work to develop and improve neurobiological rehabilitation devices every single day. Continue reading

NFL to Make $40 Million Available for Medical Research; A Board Will Evaluate Proposals

New York, NY, August 31, 2017 — Barry Wilner of the Associated Press reports that, a year after the NFL pledged $100 million in support of independent medical research and engineering advancements, a huge chunk of that soon will be awarded to such research, primarily dedicated to neuroscience.

A Scientific Advisory Board assembled by the NFL is set to launch its program to solicit and evaluate research proposals for funding.

The board, comprised of independent experts, doctors, scientists and clinicians, and chaired by retired U.S. Army General Peter Chiarelli, will provide direction for the $40 million allocated under the league’s initiative. Continue reading

Stockton University Brain Research Team Seeking Volunteers in Atlantic City Area

Galloway, NJ, August 18, 2017 — Stockton University is seeking volunteers for a research project being conducted in Atlantic City, which will explore which lifestyle factors have the most significant impact on the degree of connectivity among different regions of the brain.

“As we age, we routinely participate in screenings of blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar,” noted Jessica Fleck, associate professor of Psychology.  “However, many individuals have never participated in a screening of brain health and function.” Continue reading

Princeton University Neuroscientists Show How the Brain Breaks Down Events

Princeton, NJ, August 9, 2017 — Research by Princeton University neuroscientists provides a new framework for understanding how the experience of life is accumulated, stored and recalled by the human brain.

“When you go about your day, you’re continuously assaulted with visual, auditory and other sensory information,” said Christopher Baldassano, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute (PNI).

“We don’t try to understand our world as the continuous stream that’s coming in, but we break it up into pieces we can understand and remember. The goal of this research was to look for the signatures of this kind of activity.” Continue reading

NJIT to Host Inauguration of Institute of Brain and Neuroscience Research and President’s Forum March 6

Newark, NJ, February 17, 2017 — New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) will host the inauguration of the Institute of Brain and Neuroscience Research (IBNR) and President’s Forum March 6 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Campus Center Atrium.

The IBNR was created to be the primary home for all neuroscience initiatives at NJIT, functioning as an umbrella and organizing framework for diverse areas, from basic research that looks at how animal behavior is generated in the nervous system, to mathematical modeling of neuronal oscillations, to brain imaging, to neurorehabilitation. Continue reading

NIH Reports: Stem Cell Therapy Heals Injured Mouse Brain

NIH in BlueBethesda, MD, August 23, 2016 — The National Institutes of Health (NIH) reported that scientists and clinicians have long dreamed of helping the injured brain repair itself by creating new neurons, and an innovative NIH-funded study published on August 22 in Nature Medicine may bring this goal much closer to reality.

A team of researchers has developed a therapeutic technique that dramatically increases the production of nerve cells in mice with stroke-induced brain damage.

The therapy relies on the combination of two methods that show promise as treatments for stroke-induced neurological injury. The first consists of surgically grafting human neural stem cells into the damaged area, where they mature into neurons and other brain cells. Continue reading

Princeton University Researchers Flag Hundreds of New Genes That Could Contribute to Autism

PrincetonPrinceton, NJ, August 22, 2016 — Adam Hadhazy in Princeton University’s Office of Engineering Communications writes that investigators eager to uncover the genetic basis of autism could now have hundreds of promising new leads thanks to a study by Princeton University and Simons Foundation researchers.

In the first effort of its kind, the research team developed a machine-learning program that scoured the whole human genome to predict which genes may contribute to autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

The results of the program’s analyses — a rogue’s gallery of 2,500 candidate genes — vastly expand on the 65 autism-risk genes currently known. Continue reading