Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

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Medical Innovation

HINJ’s ‘Value of Medical Innovation’ Portal Showcases How Life Sciences Is Saving Money — And Lives

New Brunswick, NJ, December 1, 2017 ― The HealthCare Institute of New Jersey (HINJ) continues to update its Value of Medical Innovation, a fact-driven, consumer-friendly digital library that delves into the myriad benefits of research-driven medical innovation, which saves money — and saves lives.

Introduced in September 2015, HINJ’s Value of Medical Innovation presents statistics from a number of resources, including the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed), the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO), the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), U.S. government sources and various medical research organizations. Continue reading

Rutgers Cancer Institute, Rutgers Health and University Hospital Unite with American Cancer Society to Fight Colorectal Cancer

New Brunswick, NJ, November 30, 2017 — Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Health, and University Hospital in Newark have announced their commitment to increase colorectal cancer screening across New Jersey by joining a national effort with the American Cancer Society in the fight against this disease.

Through proper screening, doctors can find and remove hidden growths (called “polyps”) in the colon before they become cancerous.

A first-time screening is recommended for men and women beginning at age 50.  One should discuss appropriate screening intervals with their health professional based on age, health history and family history of the disease.  Those with a family history of the disease may be encouraged to start a screening regimen at a younger age. Continue reading

Poll Respondents Appreciate Innovation’s Economic, Social Benefits And Call For More Protections

Washington, DC, November 30, 2017Mark Grayson, deputy vice president of public affairs at the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), posts on the association’s blog, The Catalyst, that, increasingly, economists and international organizations are recognizing innovation as one of the most important drivers of economic and social progress and stability.

In fact, a report released earlier this year from the Global Intellectual Property Center, declared a robust innovation environment as “essential to the success of any 21st century economy.”

However, Grayson says it’s not just think tanks and academics acknowledging the value of innovation — the public is as well. Continue reading

Medical Innovation: FDA OKs Pill with Sensor that Digitally Tracks If Patients Have Ingested Medication

Washington, DC, November 28, 2017 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on November 13 approved the first drug in the U.S. with a digital ingestion tracking system. Abilify MyCite (aripiprazole tablets with sensor) has an ingestible sensor embedded in the pill that records that the medication was taken.

The product is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia, acute treatment of manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and for use as an add-on treatment for depression in adults.

The system works by sending a message from the pill’s sensor to a wearable patch. The patch transmits the information to a mobile application so that patients can track the ingestion of the medication on their smart phone. Continue reading

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School Research: Controlling Diabetes with Your Phone Might be Possible Someday

Newark, NJ, November 27, 2017 — Think about this.  You have diabetes, are trying to control your insulin levels and instead of taking a pill or giving yourself an injection, you click an app on your phone that tells your pancreas to bring blood sugar levels back to normal.

Sound improbable?  Not according to Luis Ulloa, an immunologist at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in a paper published in Trends in Molecular Medicine.

“Our bodies are a lot like rooms in a house,” says Ulloa. “In order to see when you enter a darkened room, you need electricity to turn on the lights. Our body is like that room and has an electrical network that can be used to manipulate and help control how it works.” Continue reading

Opinion: BIO CEO Jim Greenwood on ‘Don’t Let Fear Trump Science – Vaccinate Your Child’

Jim Greenwood

Washington, DC, November 26, 2017Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO) President and CEO Jim Greenwood wrote the following op-ed that was published in The Philadelphia Inquirer on August 23:

The nice lady had sugar cubes. My classmates and I lined up, single file, at Richboro Elementary School more than half a century ago, waiting for our taste. For a kid, it was a serendipitous moment — our parents were actually ordering us to consume sweets to keep us healthy.

These were no ordinary sugar cubes, though. We were in line to take the new oral polio vaccine. Continue reading

Hill Fight Erupts Over GOP’s Proposed Roll-Back of Tax Credit for ‘Orphan’ Disease Drugs

Washington, DC, November 21, 2017 — Peter Sullivan reports in The Hill that Republicans are seeking to roll back a tax credit for drugs that treat rare diseases, alarming patient groups who fear the move would slow the development of new treatments.

The so-called orphan drug tax credit would be repealed in the tax-reform bill that passed the House last week. Patient groups are lobbying to preserve the credit, as are some drug companies.

The credit, first enacted in 1983, is intended to spur the development treatments for rare, or “orphan,” diseases that affect fewer than 200,000 people. Continue reading

FDA Announces Comprehensive Regenerative Medicine Policy Framework

Washington, DC, November 20, 2017 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on November 16 announced a comprehensive policy framework for the development and oversight of regenerative medicine products, including novel cellular therapies.

The framework – outlined in a suite of four guidance documents – builds upon the FDA’s existing risk-based regulatory approach to more clearly describe what products are regulated as drugs, devices, and/or biological products.

Further, two of the guidance documents propose an efficient, science-based process for helping to ensure the safety and effectiveness of these therapies, while supporting development in this area. Continue reading

Bill Gates Investing $50 Million to Help Alzheimer’s Research — And It’s Personal

Bill Gates

Seattle, WA, November 16, 2017 — Lindsey Bever reports in The Washington Post that Bill Gates is personally investing $50 million to help fund research to find a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, a type of dementia Gates says has struck members of his own family.

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, which destroys memory and other mental processes, so Gates said he is investing his own money in the Dementia Discovery Fund, a private-public partnership to search for a solution.

“It’s a terrible disease that devastates both those who have it and their loved ones,” the philanthropist wrote on November 13 on his blog. Continue reading

Rutgers-Led Research May Lead to New Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Nerve Injuries

Robert O’Hagan

New Brunswick, NJ, November 13, 2017 — Todd B. Bates reports that inside cells, protein “motors” act like trucks on tiny cellular highways to deliver life-sustaining cargoes.

Now a team led by Rutgers University–New Brunswick researchers has discovered how cells deploy enzymes to place traffic control and “roadway under construction” signs along cellular highways.

“To stay alive and function, every cell in our body needs to transport cargoes to the place they’re needed inside the cell, in the right amount and at the right time,” said Robert O’Hagan, lead author of a new study and assistant research professor in the Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey and the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University–New Brunswick. Continue reading