Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

To learn more click here

Medical Innovation

Bill Gates Investing $50 Million to Help Alzheimer’s Research — And It’s Personal

Bill Gates

Seattle, WA, November 16, 2017 — Lindsey Bever reports in The Washington Post that Bill Gates is personally investing $50 million to help fund research to find a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, a type of dementia Gates says has struck members of his own family.

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, which destroys memory and other mental processes, so Gates said he is investing his own money in the Dementia Discovery Fund, a private-public partnership to search for a solution.

“It’s a terrible disease that devastates both those who have it and their loved ones,” the philanthropist wrote on November 13 on his blog. Continue reading

Rutgers-Led Research May Lead to New Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Nerve Injuries

Robert O’Hagan

New Brunswick, NJ, November 13, 2017 — Todd B. Bates reports that inside cells, protein “motors” act like trucks on tiny cellular highways to deliver life-sustaining cargoes.

Now a team led by Rutgers University–New Brunswick researchers has discovered how cells deploy enzymes to place traffic control and “roadway under construction” signs along cellular highways.

“To stay alive and function, every cell in our body needs to transport cargoes to the place they’re needed inside the cell, in the right amount and at the right time,” said Robert O’Hagan, lead author of a new study and assistant research professor in the Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey and the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University–New Brunswick. Continue reading

PhRMA ‘Pipeline’ Report: 74 Percent of Medicines in Development Have Potential to Be First-in-Class Treatments

Washington, DC, November 11, 2017 — Seventy-four percent of medicines in clinical development around the world are potentially first-in-class medicines, meaning they use a completely new approach to fighting a disease, according to a September report by The Analysis Group, Inc. commissioned by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

“The Biopharmaceutical Pipeline: Innovative Therapies in Clinical Development” report examines the global state of the drug development pipeline and provides insights into new approaches biopharmaceutical researchers are pursuing.

The pipeline report, which updates a previous analysis, highlights new treatment approaches such as cell therapy and gene therapy, as well as DNA or RNA therapeutics and conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Continue reading

Over 200 Patient Groups Call on House to Reinstate Orphan Drug Tax Credit in GOP’s Tax Reform Bill

Washington, DC, November 9, 2017 — More than 200 nonpartisan patient groups sent a letter to U.S. House of Representatives leadership, Republican and Democratic, urging policymakers not to repeal the Orphan Drug Tax Credit in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

The proposed change to repeal the Orphan Drug Tax Credit would result in one-third fewer new treatments for rare diseases going forward.

Of the approximately 7,000 diseases considered rare in the U.S., only a few hundred have FDA-approved treatments.  The Orphan Drug Tax Credit gives hope to the nearly 95 percent of individuals with rare diseases who are still without a treatment. Continue reading

Rutgers-Newark Opens $59 Million State-of-the-Art Life Sciences Center

Newark, NJ, November 7, 2017 — Rutgers University-Newark celebrated the new Life Sciences Center (LSC II) on November 2, with a grand opening event for the $59 million, state-of-the-art, five-story science complex located on University Avenue in downtown Newark.

LSC II is the front door to the sciences quad, a contiguous, multi-building teaching and research complex that is home to the departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Earth and Environmental Sciences and the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience (CMBN). Continue reading

House Republicans’ Tax Reform Bill Would Repeal Orphan Drug Research Credits; NORD and BIO Respond

Washington, DC, November 6, 2017 — Zachary Brennan reported for Endpoints News that House Republicans on November 2 rolled out their new tax reform bill, which among other provisions to lower taxes for Americans and businesses, proposes to repeal a provision that might cause the biopharma industry some concern.

Under the House bill’s Subtitle E, section 3401 would repeal what amounts to half of the qualified clinical research costs for designated orphan drug products.

Orphan Drug Act Background

Brennan reports that under the Orphan Drug Act of 1983, Congress sought to incentivize the development of drugs to treat rare diseases by offering drugmakers tax credits, fee waivers and a seven-year period of marketing exclusivity for an approved orphan indication. Continue reading

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School’s New Adult Clinical Research Center Looks to Bring More Clinical Trials to Rutgers

New Brunswick, NJ, November 2, 2017 — Clinical research is essential to preventing and treating diseases, but barriers such as cost, staff and space can create challenges to investigators.

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School’s newly opened Adult Clinical Research Center (CRC) is working to make research more accessible to investigators and convenient for participants, paving the way for increased clinical trials at the university.

The over 11,000-square-foot CRC, adjacent to Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ, replaces the previous center, which had operated on the hospital’s third floor for 16 years, and sets the stage for growth. Continue reading

Dr. Jeetu Eswaraka Named Assistant Vice President for Comparative Medicine Resources at Rutgers Office of Research and Economic Development

Dr. Jeetendra (Jeetu) Eswaraka

New Brunswick, NJ, October 26, 2017 — Jeetendra (Jeetu) Eswaraka, DVM, Ph.D., DACLAM, who joined Rutgers University’s Office of Research and Economic Development (ORED) earlier this month as Assistant Vice President for Comparative Medicine Resources, brings a decade and a half of experience leading lab animal research programs in the biopharmaceutical industry.

“I am excited to welcome Jeetu to ORED and Rutgers, and look forward to strengthening and streamlining our operations to be of greater service to the Rutgers research community,” said Christopher J. Molloy, Ph.D., R.Ph., Senior Vice President for Research and Economic Development at Rutgers University. Continue reading

Princeton University Scientists Demonstrate Path to Linking the Genome to Healthy Tissues and Disease

Dr. Barbara Engelhardt

Princeton, NJ, October 25, 2017 — Rachel Nuwer reports that our genomes help to determine who we are — the countless variations between individuals that encode the complexity of tissues and functions throughout the body.

Since scientists first decoded a draft of the human genome more than 15 years ago, many questions have lingered, two of which have been addressed in a major new study co-led by a Princeton University computer scientist:

  • Is it possible, despite the complexity of billions of bits of genetic information and their variations between people, to develop a mechanistic model for how healthy bodies function?
  • Furthermore, can this model be used to understand how certain diseases emerge?

On Oct. 11, scientists came the closest yet to delivering an answer of “yes.” Continue reading

3-D Printing Advances Make the Technology More Useful for Surgery, Implants, Creating Drugs

New York, NY, October 25, 2017 — Aili McConnon reported in The Wall Street Journal that Mayo Clinic is part of a web of organizations racing to find ways to use 3-D printing to improve health care.

Some research institutions, including the Mayo Clinic, have set up on-site printing labs in partnership with such makers of 3-D printers as Stratasys, 3D Systems and Formlabs.

McConnon reports that General Electric Co. and Johnson & Johnson are diving in, too, with GE focused on 3-D printers and translating images from various sources into 3-D objects, and J&J focused on developing a range of materials that can be used as “ink” to print customized objects. Continue reading