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The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

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Gene Editing

Rutgers Scientists Working on CRISPR Technology That Could, Literally, Change the World

New Brunswick, NJ, October 21, 2017 — CRISPR…what’s that?  Senior correspondent David Cruz reports on “NJTV News” that CRISPR is emerging technology that you might be hearing about it yet have little understanding that it has the potential to change pretty much everything and everyone in the world.

Peter Romanienko, the managing director of the Genome Editing Core Facility at Rutgers University, explained, “CRISPR is a programmable nucleus, so the power of it is.

And what makes it work so well for gene editing and some of the techniques we use is this protein can use this small segment of RNA to find a site in the genome and cut it.  And by making this DNA break in the genome is what allows us to introduce sequences and repair.” Continue reading

Medical Innovation: First Human Embryo Editing Experiment in U.S. ‘Corrects’ Gene for Heart Condition

New York, NY, August 3, 2017 — Ariana Eunjung Cha reports in The Washington Post that scientists have successfully edited the DNA of human embryos to erase a heritable heart condition that is known for causing sudden death in young competitive athletes, cracking open the doors to a controversial new era in medicine.

This is the first time gene editing on human embryos has been conducted in the United States. Researchers said in interviews this week that they consider their work very basic.

The embryos were allowed to grow for only a few days, and there was never any intention to implant them to create a pregnancy. Continue reading

Medical Innovation: Scientists Find Form of Crispr Gene Editing with New Capabilities

Gene editing crisprNew York, New York, June 6, 2016 ― Carl Zimmer reports in The New York Times that just a few years ago, Crispr was a cipher — something that sounded to most ears like a device for keeping lettuce fresh.

Today, Crispr-Cas9 is widely known as a powerful way to edit genes. Scientists are deploying it in promising experiments, and a number of companies are already using it to develop drugs to treat conditions ranging from cancer to sickle-cell anemia.

Yet there is still a lot of misunderstanding around it.

Crispr describes a series of DNA sequences discovered in microbes, part of a system to defend against attacking viruses.  Microbes make thousands of forms of Crispr, most of which are just starting to be investigated by scientists.  If they can be harnessed, some may bring changes to medicine that we can barely imagine. Continue reading