Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

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Drug Pricing

At BioNJ Roundtable, Biopharmaceutical Executives Share What’s Behind Drug Pricing

Newark, NJ, October 3, 2017 — Vince Calio reports on NJBIZ that it’s no secret that biopharmaceutical companies have become the target of heavy criticism from politicians and consumers due to high drug prices, especially at a time when health care reform in the U.S. has become a hot-button topic.

The topic is especially of interest in New Jersey, given that some of the state’s largest employers are biopharmaceutical companies including Kenilworth-based Merck; Johnson & Johnson, headquartered in New Brunswick; and Celgene, located in Summit. Continue reading

PhRMA’s New ‘Let’s Talk About Cost’ Campaign Convenes National Dialogue on Medicine Costs

Washington, DC, September 23, 2017Robert Zirkelbach, Executive Vice President of Public Affairs at the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), in July posted on the association’s blog, The Catalyst:

Discussions about costs are important. We recognize that many are struggling to access the medicine they need and have important questions about their medicine costs.  And we want to help find the answers.

We recognize that many are struggling to access the medicine they need and have important questions about their medicine costs. And we want to help find the answers. Continue reading

Opinion: PhRMA CEO Stephen J. Ubl on ‘How to Negotiate Better Deals for Prescription Medicines’

Stephen J. Ubl

Washington, DC, June 6, 2017Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) President and Chief Executive Officer Stephen J. Ubl writes in Forbes:

The way our health care system currently pays for prescription medicines is convoluted and confusing.  We rely on a complicated system of list prices, net prices, rebates and an opaque supply chain that often results in uncertainty and frustration for patients.

It is no wonder consumers and policymakers have questions and are looking for better answers. So are we. Continue reading

BIO Produces Video Explaining How Drug Costs Are Really Determined

 

Washington, DC, February 11, 2017 — Today, much of the public debate surrounding the cost of biopharmaceuticals is focused on the list price of an individual drug or treatment regimen.

However, the list price is not what a manufacturer generally makes on the drug, and it typically has little to do with what a patient has to pay for his or her medicine.

To help put this debate into context, the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO) is releasing a new educational video today designed to give patients, consumers, policy makers and journalists a better understanding of how prescription drug costs are really determined and where the pharmaceutical dollar actually goes. Continue reading

PhRMA: First-of-Its-Kind Study Shows Growing Share of Medicine List Prices Going to Rebates and Supply Chain

PhRMA Supply Chain Report 20170118Washington, DC, January 20, 2017 — Robust competition in the private marketplace is resulting in increasingly higher rebates and discounts on medicine prices, according to a new study by the Berkeley Research Group (BRG).

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) commissioned the study.

The study is among the first to examine the share of prescription medicine spending retained by biopharmaceutical companies, generic manufacturers, pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), health plans and other stakeholders in the supply chain. Continue reading

BIO Video Explains How Drug Costs Are Really Determined

BIO Logo New NameWashington, DC, January 8, 2017 — Today, much of the public debate surrounding the cost of biopharmaceuticals is focused on the list price of an individual drug or treatment regimen.

However, the list price is not what a manufacturer generally makes on the drug, and it typically has little to do with what a patient has to pay for his or her medicine.

To help put this debate into context, the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO) is releasing a new educational video today designed to give patients, consumers, policy makers and journalists a better understanding of how prescription drug costs are really determined and where the pharmaceutical dollar actually goes. Continue reading

House Oversight Committee Starts Investigating EpiPen Price Hikes; Third Capitol Hill Panel to Dig into Mylan’s Pricing

Capitol Building flagWashington, DC, August 30, 2016 — Catherine Ho reports in The Washington Post that the U.S. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has launched an investigation into drug maker Mylan, which is facing intense public and political scrutiny for raising the price of its lifesaving EpiPen allergy injection.

The price of an EpiPen two-pack has risen from less than $100 in 2007, the year Mylan acquired the device, to $608 today.

The House Oversight Committee is the third congressional committee to press Mylan on its pricing practices.   Continue reading

NJTV News: Specialty Drugs Cost More Than Most Yearly Incomes; HINJ CEO Interviewed

NJTV News w Mary Alice WilliamsNewark, NJ, December 7, 2015 ― In a segment broadcast on December 4, NJTV News correspondent Erin Delmore explored prescription drug prices in the US. and consumer concerns.

Assemblyman Daniel Benson (D-14), Vice Chair of the Health & Senior Services Committee, says mounting drug prices — including Turing Pharmaceuticals’ hiking a lifesaving medication by 5,000 percent — have prompted concerned New Jerseyans to call his office, even if they have insurance.

“What we’re hearing, for the most part is: ‘I’ve bought insurance, I’m paying these large premiums per month and I still can’t get the drugs that I need to have a quality, a frame of life, because the co-pays are so high,’” Benson told Delmore. Continue reading