Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

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Congress

Hill Fight Erupts Over GOP’s Proposed Roll-Back of Tax Credit for ‘Orphan’ Disease Drugs

Washington, DC, November 21, 2017 — Peter Sullivan reports in The Hill that Republicans are seeking to roll back a tax credit for drugs that treat rare diseases, alarming patient groups who fear the move would slow the development of new treatments.

The so-called orphan drug tax credit would be repealed in the tax-reform bill that passed the House last week. Patient groups are lobbying to preserve the credit, as are some drug companies.

The credit, first enacted in 1983, is intended to spur the development treatments for rare, or “orphan,” diseases that affect fewer than 200,000 people. Continue reading

FDA vs. Pentagon: U.S. House Passes Fix to Defense Bill’s Drug Approval Provision

Washington, DC, November 17, 2017 — Rebecca Kheel reports in The Hill that the U.S. House on Wednesday, November 15 passed by voice vote a bill to speed up Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of medical devices and drugs to be used on the battlefield.

The bill is meant to address a controversial provision of the annual defense policy bill passed by the House on Tuesday that would allow the Pentagon to sign off on unapproved devices and drugs.

“Our men and women in uniform have put their lives on the line for this country, and they deserve to have the earliest possible access to medical products that could save their lives on the battlefield,” Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden (R-Ore.) said on the House floor Wednesday. “We found a good balance with our friends on the Armed Services Committee, and in working with the FDA and the leadership of the Pentagon.” Continue reading

Trump Selects Alex Azar to Serve as Secretary of Health and Human Services

Alex Azar

Washington, DC, November 14, 2017 — President Donald J. Trump yesterday announced his nomination of Alex Azar, a former pharmaceutical executive and a top health official during the George W. Bush administration, to lead the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

In announcing that he is nominating Azar to be secretary of the government’s largest civilian department, the president turned to a health policy insider and conservative thinker.

Azar spent a decade at Eli Lilly and Co., including five years as president of Lilly USA, its biggest affiliate, before stepping down in January to work as a health-care consultant. Continue reading

Controversy Erupts Over Congressional Plan to Let Pentagon Bypass FDA and OK Unapproved Drugs for Battlefield Use

Washington, DC, November 10, 2017 — Should the Pentagon be allowed to authorize the use of unapproved drugs and medical devices on an emergency basis for combat soldiers?

That question, Laurie McGinley reports in The Washington Post, has sparked a furious battle this week among some of Washington’s biggest power players, with the Defense Department and its congressional advocates on one side and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the health committees on the other.

The Capitol Hill clash was set off by a provision in the annual defense authorization bill. Continue reading

Over 200 Patient Groups Call on House to Reinstate Orphan Drug Tax Credit in GOP’s Tax Reform Bill

Washington, DC, November 9, 2017 — More than 200 nonpartisan patient groups sent a letter to U.S. House of Representatives leadership, Republican and Democratic, urging policymakers not to repeal the Orphan Drug Tax Credit in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

The proposed change to repeal the Orphan Drug Tax Credit would result in one-third fewer new treatments for rare diseases going forward.

Of the approximately 7,000 diseases considered rare in the U.S., only a few hundred have FDA-approved treatments.  The Orphan Drug Tax Credit gives hope to the nearly 95 percent of individuals with rare diseases who are still without a treatment. Continue reading

U.S. House Votes to Repeal Obamacare’s Independent Payment Advisory Board

Washington, DC, November 6, 2017 — Nathaniel Weixel reports in The Hill that the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday, November 2 voted to repeal a controversial Medicare cost-cutting board that has drawn the ire of both parties.

Lawmakers voted 307-111 to abolish what is known as the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB).  The board is tasked with coming up with Medicare cuts if spending rises above a certain threshold but has been criticized as outsourcing the work of Congress.

Ten of New Jersey’s 12 members of the House voted in favor of H.R. 849, the “Protecting Seniors Access to Medicare Act.” Continue reading

House Republicans’ Tax Reform Bill Would Repeal Orphan Drug Research Credits; NORD and BIO Respond

Washington, DC, November 6, 2017 — Zachary Brennan reported for Endpoints News that House Republicans on November 2 rolled out their new tax reform bill, which among other provisions to lower taxes for Americans and businesses, proposes to repeal a provision that might cause the biopharma industry some concern.

Under the House bill’s Subtitle E, section 3401 would repeal what amounts to half of the qualified clinical research costs for designated orphan drug products.

Orphan Drug Act Background

Brennan reports that under the Orphan Drug Act of 1983, Congress sought to incentivize the development of drugs to treat rare diseases by offering drugmakers tax credits, fee waivers and a seven-year period of marketing exclusivity for an approved orphan indication. Continue reading

Senator Booker Sponsors Legislation to Advance Small-Business Accelerators and Incubators

Senator Cory Booker

Trenton, NJ, November 2, 2017 — John Reitmeyer reports on NJ Spotlight that a major element of President Donald Trump’s plan to overhaul the federal tax code involves corporate tax-rate cuts that are supposed to lead to more business investment and hiring.

But a bipartisan group of lawmakers — including New Jersey’s Cory Booker — is backing legislation that follows a different approach to economic growth by investing directly in the development of small businesses and startups.

Reitmeyer reports that a measure introduced in October in both the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives calls for $6 million in additional funding to go to the federal Small Business Administration (SBA) to help maintain the agency’s Growth Accelerator Fund for another five years. Continue reading

U.S. House Passes Bill Enhancing Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs

Westerville, OH, October 12, 2017 ― Jason Rittenberg reports on the State Science & Technology Institute (SSTI) news blog that the U.S. House this week passed H.R. 2763, which would amend the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs in several significant ways.

Most notably, the bill would extend by five years the “assistance for administrative… costs,” which is used for outreach initiatives and some business and market assistance initiatives across agencies.

The bill would extend or implement other activities within SBIR/STTR, nearly all of which would improve the programs’ ability to support commercialization in parallel with technological development. Continue reading

Eric Hargan Sworn In as Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services Department

HHS Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan

Washington, DC, October 12, 2017 — The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that Eric Hargan has been sworn in as Deputy Secretary.

The U.S. Senate confirmed Mr. Hargan to fill the No. 2 position at HHS on October 4, just days after Secretary Tom Price resigned.

The 57-to-38 Senate vote was largely along party lines.  Seven Democrats and Sen. Angus King (I-Maine) supported the nomination, according to The Hill. Continue reading