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The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

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Brain

Princeton Neuroscience Institute Join with 19 Other Laboratories to Create Virtual Mega-Laboratory; Aims to Probe the Brain’s Deepest Secrets

Princeton, NJ, October 4, 2017Princeton Neuroscience Institute researchers are joining with scientists from 19 other laboratories around the world to create the $15 million International Brain Laboratory (IBL).

Two Princeton neuroscience labs — led by Jonathan Pillow and Ilana Witten — are joining forces with researchers from Europe and the United States to crack the code on how the brain makes choices, by studying the activity and interactions between individual neurons across its different areas.

IBL researchers come from the United States, Great Britain, Portugal, France and Switzerland. Continue reading

Rutgers NJ Medical School Research: Memory Decline After Head Injury May be Prevented by Slowing Brain Cell Growth

New Brunswick, NJ, September 20, 2017 — Robin Lally reports on Rutgers Today that the excessive burst of new brain cells after a traumatic head injury that scientists have traditionally believed helped in recovery could instead lead to epileptic seizures and long-term cognitive decline, according to a new Rutgers New Jersey Medical School study.

In the September issue of Stem Cell Reports, Viji Santhakumar, Ph.D., associate professor in Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Neuroscience, and her colleagues, challenge the prevailing assumption by scientists in the field that excessive neurogenesis (the birth of new brain cells) after injury is advantageous. Continue reading

NIH to Walk Away from $16 Million of NFL Gift for Brain Research

Washington, DC, September 1, 2017The Los Angeles Times reported in July that, five years ago, four months after the suicide of legendary linebacker Junior Seau, the National Football League donated $30 million to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for brain research.

At the time, the league said its “unrestricted gift” was the largest donation in its history and would help fund a new Sports and Health Research Program to be conducted in collaboration with institutes and centers at the NIH. Continue reading

Stockton University Brain Research Team Seeking Volunteers in Atlantic City Area

Galloway, NJ, August 18, 2017 — Stockton University is seeking volunteers for a research project being conducted in Atlantic City, which will explore which lifestyle factors have the most significant impact on the degree of connectivity among different regions of the brain.

“As we age, we routinely participate in screenings of blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar,” noted Jessica Fleck, associate professor of Psychology.  “However, many individuals have never participated in a screening of brain health and function.” Continue reading

Rutgers Research: Traumatic Brain Injuries May be Helped with Drug Used to Treat Bipolar Disorder

New Brunswick, NJ, May 10, 2017 — A drug used to treat bipolar disorder and other forms of depression may help to preserve brain function and prevent nerve cells from dying in people with a traumatic brain injury, according to a new Rutgers University study.

In research published in Scientific Reports on May 8, Rutgers scientists discovered that lithium — used as a mood stabilizer and to treat depression and bipolar disorder — and rapamycin, a treatment for some forms of cancer, protected nerve cells in the brain and stopped the chemical glutamate from sending signals to other cells and creating further brain cell damage. Continue reading

Neuroscience Milestone: Updated Brain Map Identifies Nearly 100 Previously Unknown Regions

Brain new scan 2016New York, NY, July 21, 2016 ― Carl Zimmer reports in The New York Times that the brain looks like a featureless expanse of folds and bulges, but it’s actually carved up into invisible territories.

Each is specialized: Some groups of neurons become active when we recognize faces, others when we read, others when we raise our hands.

On July 20, in what many experts are calling a milestone in neuroscience, researchers published a spectacular new map of the brain, detailing nearly 100 previously unknown regions — an unprecedented glimpse into the machinery of the human mind. Continue reading

NIH: Human Connectome Project Marks Its First Phase

NIH in BlueBethesda, MD, June 13, 2016 ― Scans of an individual’s brain activity are emerging as powerful predictive tools, thanks to the Human Connectome Project (HCP), an initiative of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Such individual differences were often discarded as “noise” – uninterpretable apart from group data. Now, recently reported studies based on HCP neuroimaging and psychological data show that individual differences in brain connectivity can reliably predict a person’s behavior.

Such scans might someday help clinicians personalize diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders, say researchers.

One study found that an individual’s unique resting state connectivity “fingerprint” can accurately predict fluid intelligence. Continue reading

Princeton’s Schmidt Fund Transformative Technology Awards Go to Neuroscience, 3-D Cellular Imaging

PrincetonPrinceton, NJ, March 7, 2016 ― A technology to uncover how the infant brain learns language and a microscope that can image and manipulate the inner workings of a functioning cell have been awarded funding through Princeton University’s Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund.

The fund, endowed in 2009 by Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google parent company Alphabet Inc., and his wife, Wendy, supports research projects at Princeton University that have the potential to make a major impact in a field of science or technology. Eric Schmidt is a 1976 graduate of Princeton and a former trustee of the University. Continue reading