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The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

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New CDC Study Shows Changes in Breast Cancer Death Rates by Age Group

CDC LogoAtlanta, GA, October 26, 2016 — Breast cancer death rates among women decreased during 2010-2014, but racial differences persisted, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The findings show changes for death rates from breast cancer by age group for black and white women, the groups with the highest death rates in the United States.

“Our latest data suggest some improvement for black women when it comes to disparities,” said Lisa Richardson, MD, Director of CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control.

“First, the decline in deaths suggests that white and black women under 50 are benefiting equally from cancer treatments,” Dr. Richardson said.  “Second, we’re hopeful the lack of difference in death rates between black and white women under 50 will start to be seen in older women.”

Data Highlights

  • There was a faster decrease in breast cancer death rates for white women (1.9% per year) than black women (1.5 percent per year) between 2010 and 2014.
  • Among women under age 50, breast cancer death rates decreased at the same pace for black and white women.
  • The largest difference by race was among women ages 60–69 years: breast cancer death rates dropped 2.0 percent per year among white women, compared with 1.0 percent per year among black women.
  • The authors noted that the drop-in death rates among women may be due to improved education about the importance of appropriate breast cancer screening and treatment, as well as women having access to personalized and cutting-edge treatment.

Jacqueline Miller, M.D., medical director of CDC’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, said, “The good news is that overall rates of breast cancer are decreasing among black women.  However, when compared with white women, the likelihood that a black woman will die after a breast cancer diagnosis is still considerably higher.”

For CDC resources on what can be done to reduce breast cancer risk, click here.