Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

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Medical Innovation

HINJ’s ‘Value of Medical Innovation’ Portal Showcases How Life Sciences Is Saving Money — And Lives

New Brunswick, NJ, December 1, 2017 ― The HealthCare Institute of New Jersey (HINJ) continues to update its Value of Medical Innovation, a fact-driven, consumer-friendly digital library that delves into the myriad benefits of research-driven medical innovation, which saves money — and saves lives.

Introduced in September 2015, HINJ’s Value of Medical Innovation presents statistics from a number of resources, including the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed), the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO), the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), U.S. government sources and various medical research organizations. Continue reading

Rutgers Cancer Institute, Rutgers Health and University Hospital Unite with American Cancer Society to Fight Colorectal Cancer

New Brunswick, NJ, November 30, 2017 — Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Health, and University Hospital in Newark have announced their commitment to increase colorectal cancer screening across New Jersey by joining a national effort with the American Cancer Society in the fight against this disease.

Through proper screening, doctors can find and remove hidden growths (called “polyps”) in the colon before they become cancerous.

A first-time screening is recommended for men and women beginning at age 50.  One should discuss appropriate screening intervals with their health professional based on age, health history and family history of the disease.  Those with a family history of the disease may be encouraged to start a screening regimen at a younger age. Continue reading

Medical Innovation: FDA OKs Pill with Sensor that Digitally Tracks If Patients Have Ingested Medication

Washington, DC, November 28, 2017 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on November 13 approved the first drug in the U.S. with a digital ingestion tracking system. Abilify MyCite (aripiprazole tablets with sensor) has an ingestible sensor embedded in the pill that records that the medication was taken.

The product is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia, acute treatment of manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and for use as an add-on treatment for depression in adults.

The system works by sending a message from the pill’s sensor to a wearable patch. The patch transmits the information to a mobile application so that patients can track the ingestion of the medication on their smart phone. Continue reading

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School Research: Controlling Diabetes with Your Phone Might be Possible Someday

Newark, NJ, November 27, 2017 — Think about this.  You have diabetes, are trying to control your insulin levels and instead of taking a pill or giving yourself an injection, you click an app on your phone that tells your pancreas to bring blood sugar levels back to normal.

Sound improbable?  Not according to Luis Ulloa, an immunologist at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in a paper published in Trends in Molecular Medicine.

“Our bodies are a lot like rooms in a house,” says Ulloa. “In order to see when you enter a darkened room, you need electricity to turn on the lights. Our body is like that room and has an electrical network that can be used to manipulate and help control how it works.” Continue reading

FDA Announces Comprehensive Regenerative Medicine Policy Framework

Washington, DC, November 20, 2017 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on November 16 announced a comprehensive policy framework for the development and oversight of regenerative medicine products, including novel cellular therapies.

The framework – outlined in a suite of four guidance documents – builds upon the FDA’s existing risk-based regulatory approach to more clearly describe what products are regulated as drugs, devices, and/or biological products.

Further, two of the guidance documents propose an efficient, science-based process for helping to ensure the safety and effectiveness of these therapies, while supporting development in this area. Continue reading

Rutgers-Led Research May Lead to New Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Nerve Injuries

Robert O’Hagan

New Brunswick, NJ, November 13, 2017 — Todd B. Bates reports that inside cells, protein “motors” act like trucks on tiny cellular highways to deliver life-sustaining cargoes.

Now a team led by Rutgers University–New Brunswick researchers has discovered how cells deploy enzymes to place traffic control and “roadway under construction” signs along cellular highways.

“To stay alive and function, every cell in our body needs to transport cargoes to the place they’re needed inside the cell, in the right amount and at the right time,” said Robert O’Hagan, lead author of a new study and assistant research professor in the Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey and the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University–New Brunswick. Continue reading

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School’s New Adult Clinical Research Center Looks to Bring More Clinical Trials to Rutgers

New Brunswick, NJ, November 2, 2017 — Clinical research is essential to preventing and treating diseases, but barriers such as cost, staff and space can create challenges to investigators.

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School’s newly opened Adult Clinical Research Center (CRC) is working to make research more accessible to investigators and convenient for participants, paving the way for increased clinical trials at the university.

The over 11,000-square-foot CRC, adjacent to Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ, replaces the previous center, which had operated on the hospital’s third floor for 16 years, and sets the stage for growth. Continue reading

Dr. Jeetu Eswaraka Named Assistant Vice President for Comparative Medicine Resources at Rutgers Office of Research and Economic Development

Dr. Jeetendra (Jeetu) Eswaraka

New Brunswick, NJ, October 26, 2017 — Jeetendra (Jeetu) Eswaraka, DVM, Ph.D., DACLAM, who joined Rutgers University’s Office of Research and Economic Development (ORED) earlier this month as Assistant Vice President for Comparative Medicine Resources, brings a decade and a half of experience leading lab animal research programs in the biopharmaceutical industry.

“I am excited to welcome Jeetu to ORED and Rutgers, and look forward to strengthening and streamlining our operations to be of greater service to the Rutgers research community,” said Christopher J. Molloy, Ph.D., R.Ph., Senior Vice President for Research and Economic Development at Rutgers University. Continue reading

Princeton University Scientists Demonstrate Path to Linking the Genome to Healthy Tissues and Disease

Dr. Barbara Engelhardt

Princeton, NJ, October 25, 2017 — Rachel Nuwer reports that our genomes help to determine who we are — the countless variations between individuals that encode the complexity of tissues and functions throughout the body.

Since scientists first decoded a draft of the human genome more than 15 years ago, many questions have lingered, two of which have been addressed in a major new study co-led by a Princeton University computer scientist:

  • Is it possible, despite the complexity of billions of bits of genetic information and their variations between people, to develop a mechanistic model for how healthy bodies function?
  • Furthermore, can this model be used to understand how certain diseases emerge?

On Oct. 11, scientists came the closest yet to delivering an answer of “yes.” Continue reading

3-D Printing Advances Make the Technology More Useful for Surgery, Implants, Creating Drugs

New York, NY, October 25, 2017 — Aili McConnon reported in The Wall Street Journal that Mayo Clinic is part of a web of organizations racing to find ways to use 3-D printing to improve health care.

Some research institutions, including the Mayo Clinic, have set up on-site printing labs in partnership with such makers of 3-D printers as Stratasys, 3D Systems and Formlabs.

McConnon reports that General Electric Co. and Johnson & Johnson are diving in, too, with GE focused on 3-D printers and translating images from various sources into 3-D objects, and J&J focused on developing a range of materials that can be used as “ink” to print customized objects. Continue reading