Who We Are

The New Jersey Life Sciences Vendors Alliance (NJLSVA) is a coalition of businesses, individuals and academia who provide goods and services to New Jersey’s life sciences companies.

The NJLSVA was founded to educate suppliers on trends in industry procurement and public policy that affects the life sciences industry.

Choose NJ’s RFP Watch

Choose New Jersey’s RFP Watch provides up-to-date information on business opportunities throughout the Garden State at a cost that is affordable for all companies – with a place of business in New Jersey – large and small.

To learn more click here

Academia

Rutgers-Camden’s New Nursing and Science Building’s Labs Offer Greater Learning and Research Opportunities

Camden, NJ, November 22, 2017 — “It’s been a long time coming,” says Danny Bubb, professor and chair of the physics and chemistry departments, as he gives a tour of the cutting-edge science labs in the new Rutgers University–Camden Nursing and Science Building (NSB).

Jeanne Leong reports that in the NSB, located at Fifth and Federal Sts. in Camden, the three new state-of-the-art physics labs provide students and faculty with access to resources including a high-powered microscope, laser systems, and a vibration-free work table only a few other colleges and universities even have.

“These new labs allow us to be very innovative with how we deliver our curriculum to engage students,” says Bubb. Continue reading

Rutgers-Led Research May Lead to New Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Nerve Injuries

Robert O’Hagan

New Brunswick, NJ, November 13, 2017 — Todd B. Bates reports that inside cells, protein “motors” act like trucks on tiny cellular highways to deliver life-sustaining cargoes.

Now a team led by Rutgers University–New Brunswick researchers has discovered how cells deploy enzymes to place traffic control and “roadway under construction” signs along cellular highways.

“To stay alive and function, every cell in our body needs to transport cargoes to the place they’re needed inside the cell, in the right amount and at the right time,” said Robert O’Hagan, lead author of a new study and assistant research professor in the Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey and the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University–New Brunswick. Continue reading

Rutgers-Newark Opens $59 Million State-of-the-Art Life Sciences Center

Newark, NJ, November 7, 2017 — Rutgers University-Newark celebrated the new Life Sciences Center (LSC II) on November 2, with a grand opening event for the $59 million, state-of-the-art, five-story science complex located on University Avenue in downtown Newark.

LSC II is the front door to the sciences quad, a contiguous, multi-building teaching and research complex that is home to the departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Earth and Environmental Sciences and the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience (CMBN). Continue reading

NJ Launches ‘65 by ’25: Many Paths One Future’ Campaign; Higher Ed, Labor, Educators Partner with Business for Competitive, Innovative and Prosperous State

Princeton, NJ, October 28, 2017 — More than 100 education, business and industry leaders took part in the official launch September 19 of New Jersey’s 65 by ’25: Many Paths, One Future campaign at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Headquarters in Princeton.

With the pace of innovation rapidly accelerating, New Jersey must provide real economic opportunities for residents by supporting and creating pathways for everyone to acquire the skills and education that will help them secure rewarding careers.

According to the latest data available, 50.2 percent of New Jersey’s workers have some level of education or training beyond high school — well short of the 65 percent economists say will be needed by 2025 to meet the demand for a skilled labor workforce equipped with high-quality, industry-valued post-secondary credentials. Continue reading

Dr. Jeetu Eswaraka Named Assistant Vice President for Comparative Medicine Resources at Rutgers Office of Research and Economic Development

Dr. Jeetendra (Jeetu) Eswaraka

New Brunswick, NJ, October 26, 2017 — Jeetendra (Jeetu) Eswaraka, DVM, Ph.D., DACLAM, who joined Rutgers University’s Office of Research and Economic Development (ORED) earlier this month as Assistant Vice President for Comparative Medicine Resources, brings a decade and a half of experience leading lab animal research programs in the biopharmaceutical industry.

“I am excited to welcome Jeetu to ORED and Rutgers, and look forward to strengthening and streamlining our operations to be of greater service to the Rutgers research community,” said Christopher J. Molloy, Ph.D., R.Ph., Senior Vice President for Research and Economic Development at Rutgers University. Continue reading

Princeton University Scientists Demonstrate Path to Linking the Genome to Healthy Tissues and Disease

Dr. Barbara Engelhardt

Princeton, NJ, October 25, 2017 — Rachel Nuwer reports that our genomes help to determine who we are — the countless variations between individuals that encode the complexity of tissues and functions throughout the body.

Since scientists first decoded a draft of the human genome more than 15 years ago, many questions have lingered, two of which have been addressed in a major new study co-led by a Princeton University computer scientist:

  • Is it possible, despite the complexity of billions of bits of genetic information and their variations between people, to develop a mechanistic model for how healthy bodies function?
  • Furthermore, can this model be used to understand how certain diseases emerge?

On Oct. 11, scientists came the closest yet to delivering an answer of “yes.” Continue reading

Rutgers Research: Antibiotics from a ‘Molecular Pencil Sharpener’; Discovery Could Lead to New Antibacterial Agents and Drugs

New Brunswick, NJ, October 24, 2017 — Picture a brand-new, unsharpened pencil. The graphite at its core can’t be used for writing until a pencil sharpener chews away its wooden tip.

Now picture microcin B17, an antibiotic that kills E. coli bacteria. Before being activated, it lies embedded in a structure called a prodrug, like the core of an unsharpened “molecular pencil.”

Todd B. Bates reports that now, for the first time, scientists at Rutgers University–New Brunswick and other institutions have discovered a “molecular pencil sharpener” that chews away its outer coating to release the powerful antibiotic. Continue reading

Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences Dedicates RBHS-South in Blackwood; Expands Rutgers’ Partnership with Camden County College

Blackwood, NJ, October 20, 2017 — With a snip of a scarlet ribbon, Rutgers School of Biomedical and Health Sciences Chancellor Brian Strom officially opened the new RBHS-South campus in South Jersey.

On the grounds of Camden County College, the campus hosts graduate and undergraduate School of Health Profession programs in three disciplines, as well as a School of Nursing bachelor’s degree program.

“The partnership between Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences and Camden County College offers more health science education in a collaborative environment,” said Chancellor Strom at the event held on the campus October 12. Continue reading

Rowan, Rutgers, Camden County College Partner on Health Sciences; Joint Health Sciences Center Construction Begins

Camden, NJ, October 18, 2017 — With a ceremonial groundbreaking on October 19, local, state and federal officials are joining with the Rowan University/Rutgers-Camden Board of Governors (Joint Board of Governors) to celebrate the beginning construction of the Joint Health Sciences Center, an innovative facility that will provide unique education and training opportunities to a new generation of health care providers.

Set to open in the spring of 2019 at the intersection of Martin Luther King Blvd. and Broadway in downtown Camden, the Joint Health Sciences Center will be the first of its kind in New Jersey.

The construction of the 95,000 square-foot building will generate approximately $72 million in economic impact in the City of Camden alone.  Continue reading

WSJ Analysis Finds Nine of 10 Largest College STEM Programs Increased Share of Women Graduates

New York, NY, October 13, 2017 — Melissa Korn reports in The Wall Street Journal that as more high-paying jobs require a degree and expertise in things like computer coding or mechanical engineering, colleges and universities are racing to fill a pronounced void in qualified candidates.

One place they are making extra effort is among women.

The U.S. Labor Department estimates there will be 510,900 engineering job openings in the U.S. by 2024, and another 426,900 software development and programming jobs will be available, all requiring at least a bachelor’s degree. Continue reading